Management

Tip from Basketball for Software Firms


Many times a software developer’s performance is judged purely on the number of “tasks” that he or she has completed. This can be the number of bug fixes or user stories completed during a given period of time. This would typically co-relate to the amount of code contributed to the product by an engineer during this period. Now this can be an important performance metric no doubt.

But in my mind software firms need to pay more attention to another important  non-tangible metric when evaluating a developer’s performance…ASSISTSI got this idea when watching some highlights of this year’s NBA finals. In basketball, an assist is when a player makes a pass to a teammate that directly results in a goal and points for the team. The number of assists a player makes in basketball is considered an important stat in terms of his performance.

Similarly in software teams, some developers may contribute in many “non-tangible” ways to assist other developers in the team. These can be in the form of architecture/design tips, suggestions for new product features, code improvements or even pointing developers to look at similar implementations in other areas of the same product.

Contributing to the team in such ways is a key trait of a good software engineer and software firms should have mechanisms in place to “quantify” (at least to some degree) such “assists” made by team members. Project/Product managers and even architects can play a key role in helping software firms identify the amount of assists that a developer has contributed during a given period when evaluating her performance. This is by no means an exact science but a “ball park” rating can be very useful.

Software engineers should also realize that their value proposition is not just about writing code but also contributing to the team goal in other non-tangible ways as well.

Look at Steph Curry for example he is not only a huge points scorer but also brilliant in assists, that’s why he is MVP!

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